The bardo, in my mind, acts as a sort of purgatory. The dead, or ghosts, in the novel, are placed in their “sick box” and are left there. The “sick box” is clearly a coffin, but it is interesting that the ghosts don’t recognize it as such. The adult ghosts, with substantial concentration, manage to remain in this state of purgatory, reflecting, while children are quicker to pass on. If the children cannot, they are subject to odd forms of torture, and this is the challenge that Willie faces, as he is not yet ready to pass on. After a…


I believe Krauss may have been somewhat overly ambitious in this particular choice. It seems clear that her attempt to subvert her character Leo’s interpretation of love by adding in the narration and perspective of other characters and their views of love. The result is a complex and often contradictory account of the human experience and the differences with which each of us approaches the nature of love. While some, who may have chosen the books hoping to discover a definitive truth about the nature of love and how it functions in society, may have been left disappointed by Krauss’ inability to deliver, but perhaps this is even more honest.


The Choose Your Own Adventure genre is one that has become increasingly prominent in the video gaming industry. Whether it be small indie titles aimed at giving the player an alternative or mind-bending story-telling experience, a sweeping RPG (role-playing game) designed to give the player the freedom to build out a uniquely custom character and story-line, or a AAA title with a few spaced out choices that allow the player to take different approaches to gameplay, the industry is beginning to more commonly make use of the very nature of player interaction by including elements of choice. As an individual…


I find this perspective of The Great Gatsby to be quite profound. Daisy and Tom, at the beginning of the book, know themselves to be upper class and well off, seeing their socioeconomic status for what it is. But both of them, in their individual ways, conflate their social status with knowledge and deserved power. Tom, in his reading of novels, sees himself as educated. But the books he reads are written by men like him who wish to retain their social power, and as such, he is blind to the worthiness of the working class. Daisy herself is given…


Respond: What is the experience of reading The Great Gatsby as a graphic novel so far? I’m interested in the ways your reading might be different than previous readings or what changes/stays the same in reading the novel through the graphic novel.

It definitely feels different to read a book in graphic novel format; You’re sort of forced to view the work in one particular light, chosen and created by the illustrator. Furthermore, as the text has been adapted to the format, the novel seems to be filtered through two separate lenses and interpretations. As you read the author’s adaptation…


It’s funny, The Great Gatsby is both one of those “Books That Everybody’s Read So It’s As If You Had Read Them, Too,” as well as one of those “Books You’ve Always Pretended to Have Read and Now It’s Time to Sit Down and Really Read Them,” to quote Calvino. I think the first time I encountered the novel was in my freshman year of high school in an English course. My teacher preferred to read snippets of books in the classroom and kept students engaged with movie adaptations, and it was then that I saw clips of the 2013…


You, as a reader, are directly addressed and involved in the narrative of Calvino’s text. Did you feel this to be limiting in any way? Did you see yourself in the text? In what ways is Calvino’s text subversive?

At the very beginning of the text, I almost felt as though I was the subject of the numbered chapters, which was an interesting experience. As the book wore on, I did begin to feel somewhat limited by the portrayal of the “main character,” as I certainly wouldn’t be chasing a girl all over town reading, but the story compelled me…


I am no creative writer, but I feel most inspired after playing witness to an artist breaking from the mold. The freedom that can come with the short story format, with the experimentation of point of view, or with a stream-of-consciousness style has often compelled me, as the consumption of these alternative stylistic choices often expose the ticks in my own thinking. My thoughts are often crowded and confused, and I tend to myself enraptured in a passive inner dialogue of my own making, just before I snap back to reality. I adore the way Borges and Calvino employ the…


What is Borges’s notion of the role of human beings in the determination and directing of their own history and evolution? According to Borges, what can the human creative powers, will, and imagination, accomplish?

This piece was fascinating to me, yet it’s intricacies of truth remain somewhat hidden. It is early, and I plan to engage with the story once more, but it strikes me how evenly the future the narrator predicts squares with the future that comes to fruition, despite all that has occurred. Our narrator is resolute, on the edge of death, and incredibly decisive in his actions…


It’s super important to place the writer and their work within a historical and personal context, so my first step would be to gather information on the author and the time period, in this case, Edna St. Vincent Millay. I might head to the library and check to see whether she has an autobiography or a biography, but the bulk of this background research could be done online. I find the sources in Dacus Online to be very helpful, specifically Academic Search Complete. I’d use these sources to gather additional information about the turn of the century and more specifically…

Elijah Walker Lyons

English + Political Science double major

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